Trish Neil

Living and working on the Central Coast, NSW.

Tag: photography

Easter scribble modified.

I am wondering if other people see what I see in these scribbly bark images. It’s a matter of perception, of figure/ground differentiation; what seems figurative to me is perhaps an abstract and meaningless mess of lines to many others.
Maybe I can make it clearer like this:
This is the image:

fools-and-innocents-11

And this is the image again. I have darkened all the ‘background’ areas, and emphasized the left ‘eye’.

fools-and-innocents-11-in-black

Does that make it clearer? Can you see the connection with Easter? It is a peculiarity of perception that once your brain has ‘seen’ something which makes sense to it in an otherwise random pattern, especially a face, you keep seeing only that face and it looks really obvious to you – but not necessarily to anyone else. I would love some feedback on this.

Enjoying the work of Joan Fontcuberta

 I am fascinated with the work of Joan Fontcuberta. He constantly questions our acceptance of the photograph because of its appearance of reality – yes I know everyone is aware of fakes, of  photoshopped models, etc etc, but we still tend to give  credence to photographic evidence despite that. That is to me the interesting thing about digital  post production work, that you can, as it were, paint with reality (or the appearance of it). Like this lovely creature from his Fauna series …..

Fauna_Fontcuberta
His work is so alive with humour; he says, “I believe in the artist transmitting joy.” Not so much of the suffering artist here!  If you don’t know his work, I recommend the adventure. His more recent work on ‘Landscapes without memory’ is also quite beguiling. These links are just the top of the Google list, but a start.

http://www.eyecurious.com/interview-joan-fontcuberta-landscapes-without-memory/

Scribble for today

Scribbly bark  scribbles are the ultimate Rorschach Test of the bush! (For those unfortunates without ready access to the Australian bush, there are tiny insects which burrow under the bark of the Scribbly Gum eucalypts and leave these wonderful patterns. Each year the tree sheds most of its outer bark and reveals a new set of scribbles. Infinite variety!)  With a little help from photoshop to emphasise what I see and produce something which looks rather like an etching, here is the first of a selection of Scribbles.

fools-and-innocents-2

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